Klaus Kenneth, Deutschland Zwei Millionen Kilometer auf der Suche – Von Hippies, Atheismus, Buddhismus, Hinduismus und Protestantismus zur Orthodoxie ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* German

http://hippiesmetorthodoxy.wordpress.com

HIPPIES MET ORTHODOXY

Klaus Kenneth, Deutschland

Zwei Millionen Kilometer auf der Suche

╰⊰¸¸.•¨* 

Von Hippies, Atheismus, Buddhismus, Hinduismus

und Protestantismus zur Orthodoxie

Zwölf Jahre zog der schweizer Publizist Klaus Kenneth auf der Suche nach der Spiritualität, Frieden und Liebe durch Europa, Asien und Südamerika. Der Weg war gefährlich und voll Enttäuschungen, Hass, Drogen und Tod. Leer und enttäuscht von Philosophien, Lehren und Religionen kehrte Kenneth zurück, und fand die Wahrheit in der orthodoxen Kirche. Seinen langen Weg hin zur einen Kirche schrieb er in seinem Lebensbericht, “Zwei Millionen Kilometer auf der Suche” nieder.

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Video: A letter to a new convert by Mother Thekla, Abbess of Orthodox Monastery of the Assumption, England

http://videosofmyheart.wordpress.com

VIDEOS OF MY HEART

A letter to a new convert by Mother Thekla, Abbess of Orthodox Monastery of the Assumption, England

Heavenly Birth of Archimandrite Symeon of Tolleshunt Knights, Essex, England

http://englandofmyheart.blogspot.com

ENGLAND OF MY HEART

Heavenly Birth of Archimandrite Symeon

of Tolleshunt Knights, Essex, England

Archimandrite Symeon died in the very early hours of Friday 21 August 2009 at the monastery of St John the Baptist where he lived at Tolleshunt Knights, near Maldon in Essex, as a result of lymphoma. He was fully conscious to the last and died in great peace.

His funeral was celebrated at 3pm on the Friday in the monastery church, where the brothers and sisters of the community were joined by a congregatino of nearly 500 who had come from all over Britain, various countries in Europe and Russia. The body of Father Symeon will rest from now on in the crypt of the monastery, beside that of Father Sophrony (Sakharov), of whom he has been one of the oldest disciples.

Born in 1928 in the canton of Vaux in Switzerland, René Jean Bruschweiler studied law at university and began to practise as an advocate, until he encountered the Orthodox Church, and then the monastic life, through close contact with Archimandrite Sophrony. Father Sophrony had come back from Mount Athos because of health problems and settled at the castle at Sainte Geneviève des Bois. Symeon then followed his spiritual father when he left in 1959, with five other monks who had come and enlarged the community, to found a monastery in south-east England.

Father Symeon translated the works of Archimandrite Sophrony from Russian into French, the most famous being Saint Silouan, Monk of Mount Athos, as well as several important works by Saint Ignatius Briantchaninov.

Quiet, humble, gentle, pure-hearted and good, Archimandrite Symeon attracted a great number of spiritual children, monastic and lay, after Archimandrite Sophrony died. He regularly visited France for the annual congress of the Association of Saint Silouan, of which he was president and other conferences, and was assiduous in his visits to monasteries with which he had a particular association and concern, especially as a much loved and deeply revered confessor.

May he rest in peace and may his memory be eternal.

A very high-ranking European man about Protestantism, Roman-Catholicism & Orthodoxy

http://havefaithorthodoxy.wordpress.com

HAVE FAITH – ORTHODOXY

A very high-ranking European man

about Protestantism, Roman-Catholicism & Orthodoxy

Fr. Athanasios Simonopetritis (from the Monastery of Simonos Petra Monastery, Holy Mount Athos, Greece) says:

Last year came to our monastery a very high-ranking European man. We chatted with cordiality. Eventually, I asked him: “Welcome! Why did you come to us, ordinary monks, you, a famous man, at moment we are not anything great…”.

He replied disarmingly: “Father, you may not be something great, as you say. However, you live in a great space and you have a great treasure, Orthodoxy!”.

I deliberately insisted on the same pace, saying: “What can a so prominent man wait by Orthodoxy?”

In the debate were four or five fathers. He looked into our eyes one by one and said: “Listen Fathers, I will confess you something: Today both ways of expression of Christianity are in intractable, we have been tired with them. Both Roman-Catholicism with legalistic spirit and Protestantism with the hard logic crushed us. We want heart and freedom! These elements are in Orthodoxy. Perhaps you don’t understand. However, we understand very well”

Source:

http://ex2x2lettersfromgreece.wordpress.com

EX 2X2 LETTERS FROM GREECE

The Life of Fr. John Maitland Moir, Scotland (1924-2013)

http://orthodoxyofmyheart.blogspot.com

ORTHODOXY OF MY HEART

The Life of Fr. John Maitland Moir,

Scotland (1924-2013)

Source:

https://journeytoorthodoxy.com

The Life of Fr. John Maitland Moir

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

Below is his official obituary. Our prayers go to all who knew and loved him, and for the repose of his holy soul.

* * *

Father John Maitland Moir, Priest of the Orthodox Church of St Andrew in Edinburgh, founder of many smaller Orthodox communities throughout Scotland and Orthodox Chaplain to the University of Edinburgh, died peacefully in Edinburgh Royal Infirmary on the 17th April 2013.

A man of profound holiness and bedazzling eccentricity, of boundless compassion and canny wisdom, utterly selfless and stubbornly self-willed, serenely prayerful and fiercely self-disciplined, Father John will surely earn a place as a unique and outstanding figure in the ecclesiastical annals of Scotland. He was born in 1924 in the village of Currie where his father was the local doctor; his fondness for his mother was always mingled with quiet pride in the fact that she was a member of the lesser aristocracy. The privileged but somewhat severe upbringing of an only child in this household together with a chronic weakness in his knees kept him apart from the hurly-burly of boyhood and directed him from an early age to more spiritual and intellectual pursuits. After his schooling at Edinburgh Academy, he went on to study Classics at Edinburgh University during the war years, his never robust health precluding any active military service. After the war, and a short spell as Classics Master at Cargilfield School in Perthshire, he moved to Oxford to continue classical studies at Christ Church and theological studies at Cuddesdon Theological College.

His interest in Eastern Christendom was awakened in Oxford and he eagerly seized the opportunity to study at the famous Halki Theological Academy in Istanbul in 1950-51. During this year he also travelled in the Holy Land and Middle East and forged friendships in the Eastern Churches which he maintained throughout his life. On his return to Scotland he was ordained in the Scottish Episcopalian Church, which he was to serve faithfully for the next thirty years. His first charge was as Curate at St Mary’s in Broughty Ferry, then for a period of six years he taught at St Chad’s College, Durham. He returned to Scotland in 1962 as Curate in Charge of the Edinburgh Parish of St Barnabas and as Honorary Chaplain at St Mary’s Cathedral, then in 1967 he moved north to the Diocese of Moray where he served as Chaplain to the Bishop of Moray and latterly as Canon of St Andrew’s Cathedral in Inverness. His devotion to his pastoral and liturgical duties as well as his personal holiness and prayerfulness inspired a sense of awe in his loyal parishoners. Only his habit of wearing the kilt beneath his cassock provoked a reprimand from his Bishop, who was more than somewhat bewildered by Father John’s fervent and unbending Scottish patriotism. The Scottish Episcopalian Church which Father John loved and served was, he believed, a Church with special affinities with the Eastern Churches: his eyes would light up when explaining how the Liturgy of Scottish Episcopalian Church, like those of the East, Continue reading “The Life of Fr. John Maitland Moir, Scotland (1924-2013)”

A Life Changed By Icons – Cliff (Isaac in Orthodox Baptism) Gardner, USA & Germany

http://heavenonearthorthodoxy.wordpress.com

HEAVEN ON EARTH – ORTHODOXY

A Life Changed By Icons

Cliff (Isaac in Orthodox Baptism) Gardner,

USA & Germany

Source:

https://journeytoorthodoxy.com

https://journeytoorthodoxy.com/2015/10/a-life-changed-by-icons/

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

—Please tell us about your background and your journey to the Orthodox Church.

My name is Cliff (Isaac in Orthodox Baptism) Gardner, and this is my background. I was raised in a Protestant Southern Baptist family. We were in the military; my father was in the U.S. Air Force. I have four brothers, a family of five boys, and we moved all over the world. We lived most our lives in America and then in Germany, where I was as a teenager. No matter where my parents moved, they always found a Southern Baptist church, including in Puerto Rico, where I was born, and Germany, where our German pastor was Southern Baptist!

I grew up in Miami, Florida where my mother was from, so we moved back to Miami after my father retired from the Air Force. Miami is where I went to high school. It was when I was in the high school that I felt called to be a missionary. I wanted to be a Protestant missionary/Bible translator in Indonesia. So I went to a Bible school in Chicago called the Moody Bible Institute—a famous Bible school. I studied Bible-Theology/Greek; it was at Moody where I first started to interact with people from the Muslim world. I was very attracted to working with Muslims. I ended up going to the University of Illinois at Chicago where I studied linguistics, Middle East studies and Arabic. This is how I met my wife Marilyn.

She was raised in Pakistan, as her parents were Baptist missionaries for over thirty-five years there. She went to nursing school in Chicago. She was a nurse and I was a linguist, and we met back to back in an Indian restaurant.

“I was amazed by the worship, the liturgy, and the icons.”

We first moved to Pakistan in 1986 where I taught English to Pakistani government employees. Pakistan was Marilyn’s home, and we were involved in a Protestant church there. Then we moved to Egypt in 1989, where we lived for seven years; this is where I first encountered Orthodoxy. I don’t think I ever met anyone who was Orthodox before I moved to Egypt. I had an Egyptian friend in Chicago, so I had met one Oriental Orthodox person before. But when I moved to Egypt, I was an English teacher and I started to meet Coptic Orthodox Christians, who were very amazing and very faithful. One of my colleagues, an English teacher, was Orthodox. She was always fasting and I didn’t understand why. She said that she fasted over two hundred days of theyear. And I was so Continue reading “A Life Changed By Icons – Cliff (Isaac in Orthodox Baptism) Gardner, USA & Germany”

France currently home to 500-700,000 Orthodox Christians and growing

http://franceofmyheart.wordpress.com

http://conversionstoorthodoxy.wordpress.com

CONVERSIONS TO ORTHODOXY

FRANCE OF MY HEART

France currently home

to 500-700,000 Orthodox Christians and growing

Source:

http://orthochristian.com

http://orthochristian.com/105307.html

ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY

The Handbook of the Orthodox Church has been published in France, providing comprehensive information and practical information about Orthodox life in France. It presents a detailed map showing the location of all Orthodox parishes, monasteries, and dioceses in France by region, and provides information about Orthodox bishops (members of the Association of Orthodox Bishops), priests, and deacons, and also about clergy who have reposed in recent years. The new publication also contains information on icon workshops, Orthodox choirs, Orthodox periodicals, documentaries and art publications, candle and bookstores, and Orthodox movements in France, reports Sedmitza.

The number of Orthodox is growing steadily in France according to the Handbook, which places it at 500,000. The Catholic publication “La Croix” places the number at 700,000, with a preponderance of Russians and Romanians arriving over the past several years. This number includes the roughly 75,000 who regularly attend services, as well as those who come on major holidays, and all who are baptized into the Orthodox Church, considering themselves Orthodox.

In the late 19th century there were 20,000 Orthodox in France, and 200,000 in the late 20th. There are currently 278 parishes in France (160 in 2000; 238 in 2010), including 21 monasteries, the first of which was founded in 1934, and the majority of which have been founded since 1991.

The number of clergymen has also been steadily growing. According to 2017 information, there are 10 bishops, and 330 priests and deacons (300 in 2010), most of them married with secular professions. The largest number of parishes belongs to the Romanian Orthodox Church, with 91. There are Continue reading “France currently home to 500-700,000 Orthodox Christians and growing”